Temple Beth Ami Philadelphia is a 60 year old tranditional Synagogue located in the NE section of Philadelphia
Temple Beth Ami Philadelphia is a 60 year old tranditional Synagogue located in the NE section of Philadelphia
Temple Beth Ami Philadelphia is a 60 year old tranditional Synagogue located in the NE section of Philadelphia

Temple Beth Ami Coming Events

UPCOMING EVENTS:

הודעות מיוחדות

Temple Beth Ami Annual Beautify the Shul

September 4th: Labor Day

September 10th: Beautify the Shul

September 16th: Leil Selichot / סליחות

Leil Selichot / סליחות Jewish penitential poems and prayers, especially those said in the period leading up to the High Holidays, and on Fast Days. In Ashkenazic tradition, it begins the Saturday night before Rosh Hashanah. If, the first day of Rosh Hashanah falls on Monday or Tuesday, Selichot are said beginning the Saturday night prior to ensure that Selichot are recited at least four times. Leil Selichot begins after nightfall Saturday, September 16th.

September 21st & 22nd: Rosh Hashanah / השנה ראש

Rosh Hashana Services Philadelphia Temple Beth Ami September 21st & 22nd: Rosh Hashanah / השנה ראש 

Rosh Hashanah / השנה ראש (literally "head of the year"), is the Jewish New Year. It is the first of the High Holidays or Yamim Noraim ("Days of Awe"), celebrated ten days before Yom Kippur. Rosh Hashanah is observed on the first two days of Tishrei, the seventh month of the Hebrew calendar. It is described in the Torah as תרועה יום (Yom Teru'ah, a day of sounding [the Shofar]). Begins at sundown on Wednesday, September 20th

Rosh Hashanah / השנה ראש (literally "head of the year"), is the Jewish New Year. It is the first of the High Holidays or Yamim Noraim ("Days of Awe"), celebrated ten days before Yom Kippur. Rosh Hashanah is observed on the first two days of Tishrei, the seventh month of the Hebrew calendar. It is described in the Torah as תרועה יום (Yom Teru'ah, a day of sounding [the Shofar]). Begins at sundown on Wednesday, September 20th.

September 22nd: Shabbat Shuva / שובה שבת

Shabbat Shuva / שובה שבת ("Sabbath [of] Return") refers to the Shabbat that occurs during the Ten Days of Repentance between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. Only one Shabbat can occur between these dates. This Shabbat is named after the first word of the Haftarah (Hosea 14:2-10) and literally means "Return!" It is perhaps a play on, but not to be confused with, the word Teshuvah (the word for repentance). Begins at sundown on Friday, September 22nd.

September 24th: Tzom Gedaliah / גדליה צום

Tzom Gedaliah / גדליה צום The Fast of Gedalia, also spelled Gedaliah, is a Jewish fast day from dawn until dusk to lament the assassination of the righteous governor of Judah of that name, which ended Jewish rule following the destruction of the First Temple. Like other minor fasts, Tzom Gedaliah begins at dawn and ends at nightfall starting Sunday, September 24th.

Yom Kippur Services Philadelphia Temple Beth Ami September 30th: Yom Kippur / כפור יום 

Yom Kippur / כפור יום Also known as Day of Atonement, is the holiest day of the year for the Jews. Its central themes are atonement and repentance. Jews traditionally observe this holy day with a 25-hour period of fasting and intensive prayer, often spending most of the day in synagogue services. Yom Kippur completes the annual period known in Judaism as the High Holy Days (or sometimes "the Days of Awe"). Begins at sundown on Friday, September 29th.

September 30th: Yom Kippur / כפור יום

Yom Kippur / כפור יום Also known as Day of Atonement, is the holiest day of the year for the Jews. Its central themes are atonement and repentance. Jews traditionally observe this holy day with a 25-hour period of fasting and intensive prayer, often spending most of the day in synagogue services. Yom Kippur completes the annual period known in Judaism as the High Holy Days (or sometimes "the Days of Awe"). Begins at sundown on Friday, September 29th.

October 5th & 6th: Sukkot / סוכות or סּכֹות

Sukkot Services Philadelphia Temple Beth Ami October 5th & 6th: Sukkot / סוכות or סּכֹות 

Sukkot / סוכות or סּכֹות (sukkōt, or sukkos, Feast of Booths, Feast of Tabernacles) is a Biblical holiday celebrated on the 15th day of the month of Tishrei (late September to late October). It is one of the three biblically mandated festivals Shalosh regalim on which Jews were commanded to make a pilgrimage to the Temple in Jerusalem. Begins at sundown on Wednesday, October 4th.

Sukkot / סוכות or סּכֹות (sukkōt, or sukkos, Feast of Booths, Feast of Tabernacles) is a Biblical holiday celebrated on the 15th day of the month of Tishrei (late September to late October). It is one of the three biblically mandated festivals Shalosh regalim on which Jews were commanded to make a pilgrimage to the Temple in Jerusalem. Begins at sundown on Wednesday, October 4th.

October 9th: Columbus Day

October 12th: Shemini Atzeret / עצרת שמיני

Shemini Atzeret / עצרת שמיני ("the Eighth [day] of Assembly") is a Jewish holiday. It is celebrated on the 22nd day of the Hebrew month of Tishrei (first month of calendar). In the Diaspora, an additional day is celebrated, the second day being separately referred to as Simchat Torah. In Israel and Reform Judaism, the holidays of Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah are combined into a single day and the names are used interchangeably. Begins at sundown on Wednesday, October 11th.

October 13th: Simchat Torah / תורה שמחת ערב

Simchat Torah / תורה שמחת ערב (lit., "Rejoicing with/of the Torah,") is a celebration marking the conclusion of the annual cycle of public Torah readings, and the beginning of a new cycle. Simchat Torah is a component of the Biblical Jewish holiday of Shemini Atzeret ("Eighth Day of Assembly"), which follows immediately after the festival of Sukkot in the month of Tishrei (mid-September to early October on the Gregorian calendar). Begins at sundown on Thursday, October 12th.

October 20th: Rosh Chodesh Cheshvan / חשון חודש ראש

Rosh Chodesh Cheshvan / חשון חודש ראש beginning of new Hebrew month of Cheshvan. Cheshvan is the 8th month of the Hebrew year. Corresponds to October or November on the Gregorian calendar. Begins at sundown on Thursday, October 19th.

October 27th: Yom HaAliyah / העלייה יום (Aliyah Day)

Yom HaAliyah / העלייה יום (Aliyah Day) is an Israeli national holiday celebrated annually on the seventh of the Hebrew month of Cheshvan, to commemorate the historic events which happened on the tenth of the Hebrew month of Nisan (Hebrew: י’ ניסן). The holiday was established to acknowledge Aliyah, immigration to the Jewish state, as a core value of the State of Israel, and honor the ongoing contributions of Olim to Israeli society. Begins at sundown on Thursday, October 26th.

November 5th: Daylight Savings Time Ends

Daylight Savings Time Ends (don’t forget to change your clocks)

November 18th: Sigd / סיגד

Sigd / סיגד an Amharic word meaning "prostration" or "worship" and is the commonly used name for a holiday celebrated by the Ethiopian Jewish community on the 29th of the Hebrew month of Cheshvan. This date is exactly 50 days after Yom Kippur, usually falling out in late October or November, and according to Ethiopian Jewish tradition is also the date that G-d first revealed himself to Moses. Begins at sundown on Friday, November 17th.

November 19th: Rosh Chodesh Kislev / כסלו חודש ראש

Rosh Chodesh Kislev / כסלו חודש ראש beginning of new Hebrew month of Kislev. Kislev is the 9th month of the Hebrew year. Corresponds to November or December on the Gregorian calendar. Begins at sundown on Saturday, November 18th.

November 23rd: Thanksgiving

December 13th-20th: Chanukah / חנוכה Hanukkah

Chanukah / חנוכה Hanukkah Services Philadelphia Temple Beth Ami December 13th-20th: Chanukah / חנוכה Hanukkah

Chanukah / חנוכה Hanukkah (Hebrew: ָּּכה ֲחנֻ , usually pronounced [χanuˈka] in Modern Hebrew, also romanized as Chanukah or Chanuka), also known as the Festival of Lights, is an eight-day Jewish holiday commemorating the rededication of the Holy Temple (the Second Temple) in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt of the 2nd century BCE. Observed for eight nights and days, starting on the 25th day of Kislev according to the Hebrew calendar. May occur any time from late November to late December in Gregorian calendar. Begins at sundown on Tuesday, December 12th

Chanukah / חנוכה Hanukkah (Hebrew: ָּּכה ֲחנֻ , usually pronounced [χanuˈka] in Modern Hebrew, also romanized as Chanukah or Chanuka), also known as the Festival of Lights, is an eight-day Jewish holiday commemorating the rededication of the Holy Temple (the Second Temple) in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt of the 2nd century BCE. Observed for eight nights and days, starting on the 25th day of Kislev according to the Hebrew calendar. May occur any time from late November to late December in Gregorian calendar. Begins at sundown on Tuesday, December 12th.

December 17th: Temple Beth Ami’s Annual Chanukah Party

December 18th: Rosh Chodesh Tevet / טבת חודש ראש

Rosh Chodesh Tevet / טבת חודש ראש beginning of new Hebrew month of Tevet. Tevet is the 10th month of the Hebrew year. Corresponds to December or January on the Gregorian calendar. Begins at sundown on Sunday, December 17th.

December 28th: Asara B'Tevet / בטבת עשרה

Asara B'Tevet / בטבת עשרה tenth day of the Hebrew month of Tevet, is a minor fast day in Judaism. The fast commemorates the siege of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylonia. Like other minor fasts, Asara B'Tevet begins at dawn and ends at nightfall starting Thursday, December 28th.

December 31st: New Year’s Eve

If there is a topic you would like information about or have information you believe our congregants would benefit from, please let our office staff know and maybe we can schedule a brunch and learn to share this with our members.

If there is a topic you would like information about or have information you believe our congregants would benefit from, please let our office staff know and maybe we can schedule a brunch and learn to share this with our members. ALL

PROPOSED DATES AND EVENTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE
AND/OR CANCELLATION.

Past Events




Celebrate Shabbat With a Visiting RabbiSaturday September 3 at 9am to 12:30 PM

On Saturday, September 3, 2016, Rabbi Mitchell Novitsky will be joining us to celebrate Shabbat with Temple Beth Ami.  Rabbi Novitsky is the brother of one of our past Rabbis, Also Rabbi Novitsky, and he is coming to join us and help us celebrate Shabbat.

Please join us and help make Rabbi Novitsky feel welcome. A Kiddish will be served after the services. All all welcome. Tell you friends and let's have a good turnout for Rabbi Novitsky, Let us show him that TBA means The Best Around. 

Hope to see you there.

RSVP on Facbook here


Photos from 5-15-16

 

 

 

 

 

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9201 OLD BUSTLETON AVENUE PHILADELPHIA PA 19115